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"Why We Argue" is an interview podcast from Humility & Conviction in Public Life that explores the triumphs and disasters of American political conversation. Hosted by Political Philosopher and Vanderbilt University Professor Robert Talisse, "Why We Argue" questions political scientists, philosophers, journalists, historians, politicians, citizens, and the great political minds of our era on how we got here. Bringing together people from all sides of the political spectrum, Talisse navigates why a little more humility and a little less dogma could go a long way. Producer Matthew Guariglia.

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Bilgrami

Thom Brooks is Dean of Durham Law School, Professor of Law and Government, and Associate in the Department of Philosophy in the School of Government and International Affairs at Durham University. His academic work focuses on issues in Ethics, Criminal Law, and Public Policy. But he is widely known as an outspoken critic of the UK Citizenship Test. His most recent book is Becoming British: UK Citizenship Examined (Biteback Publishing 2016).

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Bilgrami

Trudy Govier is Emerita Professor of Philosophy at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. Her research is focused on the nature of argumentation and questions concerning social trust, forgiveness, and reconciliation. She is also the author of a highly influential informal logic text,  A Practical Study of Argument (7th edition, Cengage), as well as Forgiveness and Revenge (Routledge 2002) and Victims and Victimhood (Broadview 2015).

 

 

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Bilgrami

Akeel Bilgrami is Sidney Morgenbesser Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, and a member of Columbia’s Committee on Global Thought.  Bilgrami’s research spans issues in Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Language, Moral Philosophy, and Political Philosophy.  His most recent book is titled Secularism, Identity, and Enchantment (Harvard 2014). And he is the author of the forthcoming book, What is a Muslim? (Princeton UP).

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Ilya Somin is Professor of Law at the Antonin Scalia Law School of George Mason University and regular contributor to the Volokh Conspiracy blog at the Washington Post. Somin’s research focuses on issues concerning constitutional law, property law, and public political participation. He is the author of The Grasping Hand: Kelo v. City of New London and the Limits of Eminent Domain (University of Chicago Press, 2015) and Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter (revised edition, Stanford University Press, 2016) .

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Eric Alterman is CUNY Distinguished Professor of English and Journalism at Brooklyn College.  Eric is also a columnist for The Nation, and a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington and the World Policy Institute in New York. He is the author of several books, including When Presidents Lie (Penguin 2004), Kabuki Democracy (Nation Books 2011), and most recently, Inequality and One City (Nation Books 2015).

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Karen Stohr is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Senior Research Scholar at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University. Stohr’s research focuses on Immanuel Kant’s moral philosophy and virtue theory. She is the author of academic articles dealing with topics such as beneficence, modesty, and friendship. In her recent book, On Manners (Routledge 2012), Stohr argues that the social niceties commonly characterized as manners have distinctively moral content.

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galston

Joshua Cohen is a faculty member of Apple University, and is Distinguished Senior Fellow at the School of Law, the Department of Philosophy, and the Department of Political Science at Berkeley.  He is the author of several influential academic articles, many of which are collected in Philosophy, Politics, Democracy(Harvard 2009), and The Arc of the Moral Universe and Other Essays (Harvard, 2011). Since 1991, Cohen has edited the Boston Review

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galston

William Galston is Ezra K. Zilkha Chair and Senior Fellow in the Brookings Institution’s Governance Studies Program. He is also a former Deputy Assistant to President Clinton for Domestic Policy. Additionally, he writes a weekly column for the Wall Street Journal.   Galston’s academic work focuses on value pluralism and civic renewal. He is the author of the books Liberal Pluralism (Cambridge, 2002), The Practice of Liberal Pluralism (Cambridge, 2004), and Public Matters (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005).

 

 

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Taylor

Paul C. Taylor is Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of the Liberal Arts and Associate Professor of Philosophy and African American Studies at Penn State. His research focuses on philosophy of race, social and political philosophy, Africana philosophy, and aesthetics. He is the author of Race: A Philosophical Introduction (Blackwell, 2013), On Obama (Routledge, 2015), and Black Is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016).

 

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Lynch

Robert George is the McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and Professor of Politics at Princeton University, and the founding director of Princeton’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. His research focuses on issues in ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of law. He is the author of the books Making Men Moral (Oxford, 1993), The Clash of Orthodoxies (Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 2001), and the recent Conscience and its Enemies (Intercollegiate Studies Institute 2013).

 

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Anderson

Elizabeth Anderson is John Dewey Distinguished University Professor, John Rawls Collegiate Professor, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and Department Chair at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She specializes in Ethics and Political Philosophy, writing on issues of social justice, equality, race, and gender. She is the author of the Imperative of Integration (Princeton, 2010) and the forthcoming Private Government (Princeton, 2017). (Credit photographer David Paterson).

 

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Lynch

Michael P. Lynch is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut, the director of UConn's Humanities Institute, and the primary investigator on the multi-million dollar grant project Humility & Conviction in Public Life, funded by the John Templeton Foundation. His research concerns truth, public discourse, and the impact of technology on democratic society. He is the author of True to Life (MIT, 2004), In Praise of Reason (MIT, 2012) and recently The Internet of Us (Liveright, 2016).