How We Argue: The Moral Foundations of Politics and Law

The University of Connecticut Law School and Connecticut Law Review are hosting a symposium entitled: “How We Argue: The Moral Foundations of Politics & Law.” The symposium, which will be held on October 11 from 8:30AM to 4:30PM will feature a keynote presentation by Danielle Allen (Harvard), as well as remarks by political commentator and former presidential advisor, David Gergen, and US senator from Connecticut, Chris Murphy. This symposium is co-sponsored by the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute‘s Humility and Conviction in Public Life (HCPL) initiative. To attend, please RSVP by October 4th.

 

How We Argue Symposium Flier

Encounters: Black and Indigenous History of The Ancient Burying Ground – September 21, 2019

Encounters presents a public discussion on the history of the Ancient Burying Ground and hundreds of African-American and Native American people buried there. The discussion will take place on Saturday, September 21 10AM–12PM at the Hartford History Center in the Hartford Public Library.

Robert Talisse’s Forthcoming Book on Political Polarization

Robert Talisse is co-author of a new book coming out in Spring, 2020 entitled Political Argument in a Polarized Age: Reason and Democratic Life (Polity Books). Robert served as a member of the Humility and Conviction in Public Life’s advisory board and he is currently a professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His current research concerns Democracy, Liberalism, Pluralism, Public Reason. His other research areas include contemporary political philosophy, pragmatism, and ethics. 

Ruth Braunstein’s New Book on “Religion, Humility, and Democracy”

University of Connecticut sociology professor and HCPL core faculty Ruth Braunstein has a new book entitled “Religion, Humility, and Democracy in a Divided America.” This edited volume explores how religion and religious convictions shape American political life, both as drivers of polarization and as agents of political engagement. Ruth’s other books include Prophets and Patriots: Faith in Democracy Across the Political Divide and an edited volume entitled Religion and Progressive Activism: New Stories About Faith and Politics. She is also a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Cultural Sociology.

 

Michael Lynch on MSNBC Talking about Social Media Use in Public Life

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UConn-UCHI) director and HCPL co-PI Michael Lynch joined MSNBC's Morning Joe and company to talk about his new book "Know-It-All Society: Truth and Arrogance in Political Culture." His book examines the predominant way that social media is deployed in today's culture. Facebook and Twitter are not necessarily used to share facts, knowledge, or accurate information, but are rather avenues for us to express our public courage at those who do not share our convictions. Social media, arrogance, and personal convictions are the ingredients for an addictive drug that fans the flames of our public divisions and grounds us in our tribal affiliations: white nationalism and authoritarianism to the right, and identify politics and arrogant liberalism to the left. What's the solution? Perhaps a dose of humility. Michael Lynch is also the Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of philosophy at UConn.

 

Presenting Science to the Public in a Post-Truth Era

Friday, May 24, 2019 4-7pm
Dodd Center Auditorium

With Dr. Åsa Wikforss (Stockholm University), Dr. Michael Lynch (University of Connecticut), Dr. Tali Sharot (University College London)

Sponsored jointly by the Science of Learning & Art of Communication (SLAC) program and the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) How can we present scientific information to the public in an era where increasingly expertise and scientific consensus are dismissed as opinion or fake news? Three eminent experts will discuss this challenge, followed by a panel discussion and Q&A with the audience. Reception to follow Free and open to the public

For more information, contact: Holly Fitch (ROSLYN.H.FITCH@UCONN.EDU) or Charlotte Nelson (CHARLOTTE.NELSON@UCONN.EDU)